5 ways cooking can give you that inner peace you are craving for 5 ways cooking can give you that inner peace you are craving for

5 ways cooking can give you that inner peace you are craving for

Cooking at home can really improve your mood every day.

Cooking at home can definitely improve your mental health. The repetition of the motions to slice and dice vegetables, the bubbling of a broth, the sound of adding pasta to boiling water, and the aromas that fill the room as you bring your meal closer to completion is just…satisfying.

Cooking at home can definitely improve your mental health.

Cooking is actually used as a therapy and professionals have different names for this process: therapeutic cooking, culinary therapy, and culinary mindfulness. All these labels embody the same belief: cooking at home can benefit your mental health.

“Cooking at home, or other places are good for your mental health because cooking is an act of patience, mindfulness, an outlet for creative expression, a means of communication, and helps to raise one’s self-esteem as the cook can feel good about doing something positive for their family, themselves or loved ones,” Julie Ohana LMSW and founder of Culinary Art Therapy in West Bloomfield, Michigan.

Cooking at home, or other places are good for your mental health because cooking is an act of patience, mindfulness, an outlet for creative expression

Of course, one thing doesn’t replace the other, certainly cooking can’t and won’t replace therapy. If you are struggling with something you must reach a mental health professional.

But here’s a list of the benefits of cooking for you:

1- Feel accomplished

It’s an achievable goal for yourself so when you get there you get a sense of fulfillment. It combat procrastination as it involves positive, goal-oriented behavior.

2- Creativity awakens

A 2016 study published in the Journal of Positive Psychology found that people who engage in creative pursuits — writing, doodling, singing, cooking — appear to lead happier lives.

3- A practical exercise in patience

The proverb says, “patience is a virtue.” Dr. Judith Orloff, psychiatrist and New York Times bestselling author, wrote in an article: “Patience doesn’t mean passivity or resignation, but power. It’s an emotionally freeing practice of waiting, watching, and knowing when to act.”

4- Connecting with others

Cooking for others can be extremely rewarding and fulfilling. But if you ask others to take an active role in the kitchen it can create a sense of community and also improve communication.

5- Build a better relationship with food

Learning to cook at home can have a positive impact on your relationship with food, you can learn about ingredients and combinations and start making your own stuff at your own pace.

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